The Ills Of Female Genital Mutilation

Women’s Health in Africa & the Gulf

How disturbed cultural ills conflict with women’s health in emerging economies

Female genital mutilation is one of the worst humanitarian issues in the world. It happens to many women around the world, mostly in developing economies with a prevailing culture that supports the idea. The surgical procedure is not legal in the United Kingdom but there are fears that some girls living in the United Kingdom might have had to go through it in their home country.

The surgical procedure is medically harmful and it is always conducted by female doctors with no medical training. Toxic materials, such as glass shards, knives, scissors, razor blades and scalpels are used to perform this surgical procedure, and it is a horrific story.

Many women suffer from shock after it is carried out (reportedly, at as young a age as 9) but they volunteer to go through with it, quite an awful lot, because of perhaps the humiliation they suffer at the hands of people in their locality.

Men refuse to take a wife unless the woman has had the surgical procedure operated on them, disturbingly, their families are wrongfully humiliated if the truth is let out and there is no cultural change in sight over this problem.

The humanitarian issues with the crisis is such that women are suffering from this distorted medical point of view that female genital mutilation is a necessary surgical procedure. It is not. There are no medical positives to it and women suffer from dysfunctional effects such as, serious pain and bleeding.

The only way to combat this illness is to have a change in cultural perceptions and an absorption of the concept that female genital mutilation is not a medical necessity at all – it should be avoided at all costs and women and families, that suffer from these atrocities, in the name of medical malpractice, must speak up and be willing to change societal tricks, as well as age-old primitive perceptions of health, for this to happen.

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Author: Osmi Anannya

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