Pakistan’s National Security Is At Stake

The attacks on Pakistan is challenging de rigueur ideas of how a society should function

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Can today’s #politics in Pakistan, finally, alter everything?

The security situation in Pakistan is worsening by the minute because now young children in Karachi are given firearms by the state army to protect themselves in the face of terrorism. As arrests upon arrests bring no solution to threats posed by Al Qaeda and other similar terror groups to Pakistan, there is also the big question of what is happening to India’s neighbour: there is a great debate over there about how students at university need to now protect their country, rather than invest in an education because the terror threats to Pakistan is so huge. There is no level-headed approach to counter extremism in the country because patriotism seems to have blinded all argument in favour of winning the fight against global security. This is getting in the way of progress.

An inquiry into a recent university attack in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, revealed that poor training is responsible for the attack happening in Pakistani soil. The attack has wounded so bad, protests are happening against Bacha Khan University (BKU)’s structure and it is not hard to see why because no heed was paid to advise, CCTV cameras aiming to bring to attention suspicious activity abound were faulty and the security was insufficiently reimbursed. These attacks are responsible in causing widespread national distress, breaking people’s morals and terrorism has found this as a method to rule in Pakistan. Even though counter-terrorism efforts are running smoothly to address concerns of global security, there is still a lot more at stake, such as how these attacks can impact people’s consciousness and their psychic.

When people talk about giving ordinary people firearms to protect themselves better, they forget that they are asking a person, with no appropriate training to take part in a fire-fight, that from afar sounds easy but when you inspect that idea further you can see how dangerous that thought alone is: how can you be successful at protecting yourself against something as dangerous as terrorist threats, with the possession of a gun, and no training at all? Recently, the Prime Minister of Pakistan visited Saudi Arabia and Iran, to demonstrate that Pakistan has no interest in their regional conflicts about domination in the Gulf. Instead, it is interested as a country to maintain good ties with both, something that it wishes to prove self-beneficial over time.

It is pleasing to learn of Pakistan’s interest in having good ties with the two Middle Eastern countries. Where India is concerned, the dialogue about Pakistan largely focuses on border concerns and terrorist threats inside of Pakistan. Is that so bad? Is that so wrong, what India thinks is important about Pakistan, for the moment? I would like to believe no. Granted, there has been a lot going on about how the state can fuel terrorism and what that means about global security, in India, but sometimes desperate times call for desperate measures. What is fighting this thought is that Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif seems to go against all that underwrite his decisions and reach out to India to cool the regional tensions down, appropriately enough, for the two to peacefully exist.

The point of view that the state may or may not sponsor terrorism (sometimes) does not mean that that has to be the whole country at-large; it can also mean that the point of view is slanted towards members of the government, “politicians” and others who regularly exhibit shady behaviour, in the name of politics but nothing is ever done to screech that conversation to a halt. In these circumstances, India will show a negative attitude towards its neighbour over their approach to all of this. But better diplomacy, there is no arguing, will help to prioritize the West’s opinions about global security, and India sharing a much more amicable relationship with Pakistan, as so many would like all of this to be.

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Author: Osmi Anannya

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