The Mystery with Rosie Huntington-Whiteley

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Rosie Huntington-Whiteley recently won the ‘Businesswoman of the Year’ award at Harper’s Bazaar Women of the Year Awards. It was one of the biggest surprise wins: I was expecting to find people I had never heard of win but I guess Rosie managed to impress enough with her business acumen. She displayed it, at her best, for Marks & Spencer, for which she has designed numerous lingerie collections year after year. The collaboration ranks on the scale of ‘Topshop X Kate Moss’ somewhat because it has been there for so long but what is odd is that she actually has a directional approach to her business.

Rosie chose Marks & Spencer because she views it as a thoroughly British brand, recognized by almost everybody in the country – that is true because it is hard to escape the shopping experience in the British high street store for Brits. Fuelled by her love for vintage night-slips and lace boleros, and knowledge as a supermodel (having previously modeled for famed lingerie labels, such as Victoria’s Secret), Rosie’s contribution to the sales of lingerie at Marks & Spencer is noteworthy and it has even made her lose interest somewhat in modeling.

What does it really take to be a supermodel? How does one go about becoming one? Is it really any different from all other 9-to-5 jobs?

Rosie is inspired more these days in building her brand, conducting meetings, and piking an opinion on matters – it seems like such an early start for a British supermodel, who is really fresh from one long term collab. Granted she has done her homework in demonstrating that she can diversify her brand into offering cosmetics and as such but even then you can sense the uncontrolled eagerness in taking her brand to new heights. Having started out lighting people’s cigarettes as an intern at Profile Model Management, Rosie was suddenly picked up to be a catwalk model at sixteen. Rosie had to say goodbye to the classroom (and that God-awful internship experience IMO, peppered with humiliating tasks) for that, and went on to walk the ramp for DKNY and Ralph Lauren. I found it very strange how Rosie started out in modeling. There is no proper structure to the whole thing – what kind of potential did Rosie exhibit that made her standout amongst so many women around the world, who also probably had aspirations to be a supermodel just like Rosie?

It’s no joke. Rosie Huntington-Whiteley got picked up to be a supermodel because an agent simply saw she had potential to be a model, whilst she was interning and that also making coffee and carrying out other such scanty tasks, at the London-based modelling agency. There must have been something that impressed about Rosie for her to have that glittering modeling career but no clue as to what, and I have never been a fan of this lack-of-transparency-approach that surely props up in modeling. Having aspirations to be a model is certainly a grand thing but I think a certain level of transparency should be exhibited by supermodels, who should behave responsibly because at the end of the day, modeling is still a job, that brings home your bread, even though it is in the public eye.

Models start out by going to modeling agencies, preparing a great portfolio of modeling-materials and then depending on how much they can impress on their skills, an ordinary girl goes on to become a catwalk model or model for magazines, such as Harper’s Bazaar. It is all great that Rosie likes to have a directional approach to her brand – for cosmetics, which is aptly called ‘Rosie for Autograph’, she uses her familiarities with make-up as a supermodel to craft an enormous 51-piece palette, and she has also decorated the container with rose-gold touches. But when it comes to being a supermodel, I don’t feel Rosie should be regarded as a role model. Doutzen Kroes, started out by following the conventional standard of what it takes to become a model, and I feel that women like Kroes are far more inspiring than Rosie, and her non-transparent mystery as a supermodel.

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Author: Osmi Anannya

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