Why More Young Girls Should Go To School

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In many countries around the world, young girls constantly feel prejudice because of their gender, particularly for education. Although, countries such as Bangladesh and Ukraine have been able to majorly improve education attainment (plus, enrollment rates), the picture in every country in the world isn’t this bright: be it Iraq or India, the situations highlighted for a drop in denial to access in education, range from poverty to early child marriage, and many states are failing to push through important change.

There are many reasons why providing easier access to education for young girls should be a priority for governments: equipped with basic education skills, a young woman will be able to command her health needs, protect herself from incidents of domestic violence and gender-based exploitation, and also act as a patron of gender equality.

Women’s rights should always be put first, because without it women will not be able to perform the simplest of tasks, such as even play a part in their local democratic climates. Education helps women to become power figures in the world, and stand at par with men. It also provides women with the opportunity to make key public decisions and policy pushes, which outline providing accessible (and adaptable) education for young girls.

Women need help both at home and at work: education can inform young women on contraception, on why it is a good idea to build smaller families, and simply lead healthier lives. Furthermore, when more girls complete secondary school, the national growth rate also increases but at the moment there is still a gap inbetween the level of education amongst boys and girls.

What are needed are better schools and more girls in secondary schools because already there is a disparity in education attainment rate in the midst of girls who finish primary schools and those girls that finish secondary schools. Improving people’s awareness on why educating women is a novel idea can also start to break down barriers erected in societies, where normally men receive a higher degree of education than women to make them suitable for jobs and an income.

Bangladesh, for example, has made significant strides in the subject of women gaining the necessary education to join the national workforce, but even then, when it comes to dropping out of secondary schools, girls are exposed to a greater amount of risk than boys. There is a national shortage of female teachers in the country, in spite of its positive relationship with school attainment (plus, enrollment) rates for young girls; in Bangladesh, the improvement in the education sector has all been part of a national expansion plan introduced in the nineties, which had increased public spending for education and also created better schools.

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Author: Osmi Anannya

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