Gay Sex in India

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Gay people in India will no longer be ill-treated for something they can engage in closed quarters

The Supreme Court in India recently took the decision that gay sex is no longer going to be considered a criminal offence in the country. The Court also decided that if people wrong others because of their sexual orientation then it will mean that those people are not respecting certain basic rights which belong to gay people.

When the British still used to rule India, it had introduced a law. This was in 1861 and that was more than 150 years ago. The law had aimed to work against homosexuals because it had made it possible to maltreat a man or a woman if he or she was found to have had sex with a member of the same sex.

Only recently did that law see an exchange with the existence of a much more relaxed frame of mind towards homosexuals instead. The episode is begging the question of if such laws which still exist today in some other former British colonies will be subjected to similar exchanges in the future.

It is important to note that sex between gay people is still illegal in some of the countries which used to be ruled by the British, such as Malaysia, Myanmar, Bangladesh, Qatar and Barbados, which in my outlook demonstrates a largely reserved standpoint over the subject. So, the decision taken by the Supreme Court in India can be regarded as a sign of monumental change towards how the subject plus that of ‘gay people and their rights’ are perceived in contemporary society.

Many Indian celebrities, for example: Sonam Kapoor, Karan Johar, Kriti Sanon and Aamir Khan welcomed this change in attitude towards gay sex in India. But Indians, at large, are known to not warm to the idea of homosexuality; it is thus common to find gay people in the country who hide their sexual orientation and do not make it public.

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International Food Cultures

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How food around the world can bring world peace

Food culture around the world is really varied: in Pakistan, sweetness is added to meat, whether it is an entire chicken or the Peshawari kebab, which has pomegranate seeds in them. In India, the cooking of chicken is mixed with some hotness instead, as exhibited in the Chettinad chicken or the butter chicken. What food sometimes does is that it shows that cultural variations might exist in between nations but with food, influences of modern cultures cross borders and go over even to cultures that are quite conservative in nature.

It is fascinating to have food exhibit a little bit of ‘world peace’ in that way – cultures such as that of Pakistan doesn’t shy away from the fact that other developing nations can actually influence its food culture, which happens in the middle of sprouting of ideas that individuality in food cultures isn’t important for nations which do not have shared (modern) cultures. It is a really nice picture of cultural differences getting wonderfully respected and harmonious relationships existing in-between nations, in spite of all the many challenges.

A Gentleman

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Capsule Review

Cast: Sidharth Malhotra, Jacqueline Fernandez Suniel Shetty, Supriya Pilgaonkar, Rajit Kapur
Directors: Raj & D.K.
Rating: 4/5

Fox Star StudiosA Gentleman, starring Sidharth Malhotra and Jacqueline Fernandez is a roller coaster ride of fun and modernity. The film released this Friday, and it is an Indian ode to a largely contemporary American-style of filmmaking: slickness and an excitable, fast-paced plotline. The plotline involves two young boys, Gaurav and Rishi, who look the same but have very different personalities. Both played by Siddharth Malhotra, Gaurav’s the good Miami boy, with a high-flying career, while Rishi’s a risqué character, working for Colonel Vijay Saxena (Suniel Shetty in a feature moment), with sleek action moves – Rishi’s an assassin. Jacqueline Fernandez’s character, Kavya, reigns in the romantic arc in the movie in a thoroughly enjoyable manner – Kavya has a slight romantic interest in Gaurav, her best friend but doesn’t do anything over it. Meanwhile, Supriya Pilgaonkar and Rajit Kapur, if only briefly, makes appearances as Kavya’s parents but it was great to have them in those avatars.

The film has ‘masala’ written all over it, which is why it’s entertaining: there’s heart-pumping action, comedy elements, great dancing, romance and glamorized avatars. Sidharth proves he’s more than just a good looking young hero, in the movie, because essaying two roles meant demonstrating plenty of character-depths. Sidharth switches from the good boy image to a dangerous one in typical Bollywood-fashion – Rishi wants to quit his work as an assassin and become a man with a wife and a dog, and soon, you discover all of that can even be a possibility, since Rishi and Gaurav are alike in more ways than you imagined. The bottom line is that a good script, good looking actors, great outfits and catchy music might spell formulaic but it works and sometimes it’s brilliant to have a film like this that only runs on lighthearted entertainment-value and nothing else.

The ‘Miss Universe’ Beauty Pageant

Fashion and global cultures come together to demonstrate ‘beauties can have brains too’

The Miss Universe contest undoubtedly is the grandest beauty pageant in the world. Each year contestants from pretty much around the globe compete and showcase their talent, their country’s culture and what, over the years, I have come to regard the beauty pageant to be a celebration of: ‘beauties can have brains too’. It’s really been a mixed bag of winners for the American beauty pageant but, overwhelmingly, they have been from countries whose cultures I have always loved to immerse myself in.

I think when the big question of diversity is thrown into the picture for a beauty pageant originating in the West, I feel that the greatest example of diversity is always demonstrated by a plethora of winners from South America and India. I know it’s been demonstrated by three African countries previously, as well: Angola (in 2011), Namibia (in 1992) and Botswana (in 1999), which was an interesting display of African culture for the international beauty pageant, especially with Botswana because the year it won was also the first time the country had entered itself in the beauty pageant.

But when it comes to exotic favourites, I have always liked to see India win. In 1994, Sushmita Sen became the first Indian woman to be crowned Miss Universe, and it was a magnificent moment – India’s always been a hot favourite with me for the country’s ability to break through societal and cultural barriers for the Miss Universe contest and demonstrate that beauty can be diversified and be equally compelling.

Bollywood @ Cannes 2017

White, yellow and red…how three Bollywood stars defined fashion at Cannes this year

The breathtaking display of gowns at the French Riviera once again saw its annual addition of Bollywood glamour, with an interesting display of stars and their costume selections. It’s hard to pick favourites but I liked Deepika Padukone’s ensemble presentations, the most, for its very striking colour choices. Meanwhile, Sonam Kapoor managed to startle because I found she looked ravishing in a nude-coloured gown, but the most surprising thing this year was perhaps that Aishwarya Rai, a regular at the Cannes circuit, had really managed to put a good fashion foot forward and avoid any fashion missteps, unlike a fair few times in the past.

Deepika Padukone

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“It’s a little naughty this dress because even though you are showing nothing, you are showing everything,” says Elizabeth Saltzman (@elizabethsaltzman) who is styling Deepika Padukone (@deepikapadukone) at #Cannes2017. “We put this dress on hold the minute the Marchesa (marchesafashion) show was over. The colours are extraordinary, not just the rich plum but also the green. The morning after the Met Ball, Geogina Chapman (@georginachapmanmarchesa), Deepika and I did a quick fitting. It has a wow factor that is important for Cannes. The dress is not too much, it’s not too little, it’s not overpowering, she can get in and out of the car, she can have fun in it, she is so excited to be here.”

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Sonam Kapoor

Aishwarya Rai

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Stunner ❤️❤️❤️

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